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David Kereszteny-Lewis

From the Changes

acrylic, ink & gesso on wood panel
54.5cm x 44cm x 3cm framed

£475
Don’t Leave my Side

acrylic, ink & gesso on wood panel
51cm x 51cm x 3cm framed

£450
Halfway Fearing

acrylic & gesso on wood panel
44cm x 44cm x 3cm framed

SOLD

Halfway Hoping

acrylic & gesso on wood panel
44cm x 44cm x 3cm framed

£400
Some Guilt Spilt

acrylic & gesso on wood panel
45cm x 45cm x 3cm framed

£450
Son of the Soil

ink, acrylic & gesso on wood panel
45cm x 45cm x 3cm framed

£450
Singing Prayers and Hymns

acrylic & gesso on wood panel
45cm x 45cm x 3cm framed

£450
Clunia I

acrylic & gesso on wood panel
52cm x 52cm x 2cm framed

SOLD

Clunia II

acrylic & gesso on wood panel
52cm x 52cm x 2cm framed

SOLD

Love Burned Bright

acrylic, ink & gold leaf on wood panel
56cm x 52cm x 2cm framed

SOLD

The Winds Were in Agreement

acrylic, ink & gesso on wood panel
42cm x 42cm x 3cm framed

SOLD

The son of a miner and part time game keeper, David Kereszteny-Lewis’s work is an autobiographical visualisation of his experiences in the landscapes he has come to know and understand intimately.

‘My work is fundamentally about places I know, the emotional connection I have with them and the physical effect that society has had upon them, especially in mining and agriculture. I look for the physical scars our actions have, such as paths, fields and fences.’

David’s work is mostly based in Cheshire, Cornwall, Yorkshire and north Wales and he paints landscapes in every season of the year. His work has a constant theme of rain and water that adds its own specific atmosphere. Using mixed media such as acrylic, ink, etching and tempera and gluing additional pieces of canvas, by overworking the original canvas he drips paint and uses large brush strokes that attack the canvas like a rainstorm in a windswept barren moorland. Music also has an influence in his work; most of the titles of the work start life in the lyrics of songs that resonate with both his practice as an artist and atmosphere created within an aural musical landscape.

The actual process of making always starts with drawing and nearly always in black and white where David can establish a range of shapes that he sees in the landscapes, looking for patterns and rhythms normally created by fences, paths and roads. The biggest clash comes at the next stage; having trained as a printmaker his natural bent is towards a very graphical approach but as a painter he needs a more expressive use of paint, meaning that in any collection you will see both aspects. Studio practice always means working on several pieces at once, shifting back and forward between them. He often refers to the collection as a family that talk to each other (and to him). As with most artists he is happy to make mistakes, to get things wrong and to repurpose pieces that don’t meet expectations, using collage to develop marks and surfaces. Nothing is ever finished, every piece he makes can be developed and altered, and he is happy with that.